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Cyber Gift Guide

26 Nov

I’m getting ready for Cyber Monday! Each year, my mother and I go shopping on Black Friday, braving the crowds to find a few bargains that we just can’t live without, but this year I’m adding Cyber Monday to my shopping list.

This year I have two new friends to buy gifts for. One is a nursing student, and one has recently started her career as a pediatric nurse. I’ve been debating what to get them, and in the process I have come up with some fun ideas. I thought you might be interested in my little shopping guide, too!

For the Nursing Student:

The Skeleton Clipboard—My friend Stephanie and I recently played trivia at our local bar. Our team declared her our science and anatomy expert. A little nod to that fun with this clipboard would be a nice way to remind her of her friends while she’s working.

Lumbar Vertebra Mug—Sometimes humor and beauty do cross over. There is something about this mug that both makes me smile and look closer. The handle of this mug could be a sculpture at the MOMA! And it’s just weird enough that her coworkers won’t walk off with it by accident!

Personalized Scrub Top—The school colors for Stephanie’s alma mater are black and red. I think my favorite gift option this year is a personalized, embroidered black and red scrub top. On game days she can wear her team colors to work in a subtle, but fun way!

For the Pediatric Nurse:

Tiger Stethoscope Cover—I almost didn’t have to do any further looking when I found this stethoscope cover! I can just see Becky using that tiger to calm down a young patient.
Frog Pen Light—This frog pen light is so endearing! Becky is terrific with kids regardless of whether she has a frog on her pen light, but I can imagine Hoppy enhancing her endearing ways.

“Love Your Heart” Tote—I love this bag as a work tote. You know those days that you need to carry a change of clothes, your lunch, an extra pair of shoes, and five other things to work? This bag would be perfect for those days!

Also visit allheart.com’s Gift Guide for more ideas.

 

The Pulse November Contest!

6 Nov

Oh what stories you could tell! Well, here’s your chance. Each month, The Pulse wants to hear your best anecdotes. We’ll give you a topic of interest, you give us your best quick thinking, and you get a chance to be heard here on The Pulse. The writer of our favorite wisdom will receive a $50 to spend at Allheart.com!

This month, we want to know: If you were to give a nursing student one piece of advice, what would it be?

Please add a comment with your reply to this post. (Click here post your comment)

Women of All Shapes and Sizes

27 Oct

I just came back from a much needed, and rarely had treat – a manicure and pedicure. Part of the fun in blocking out the world while someone else tackles my hands and feet is the chance to indulge in magazines I never have time to read. As I sunk into the massaging chair and dunked my feet in the swirling water, I started flipping through the pages of the November 2nd issue of People. The first thing that grabbed me was a short blurb on a model who is 5’10, 120 pounds and, according to People Magazine, was fired by Ralph Lauren because she was too large to fit into the sample clothes used in their ads. She is considered too heavy to be a model at a size 4. Too heavy to be a model at a size 4? Have we lost our minds?

As nurses we see women and men of all shapes and sizes and we know that the average woman isn’t a size 0 (how can you be no size at all?). In fact, Wonderquest says the average American woman is just shy of 5’4 and weighs 152 pounds – about a size 14. I’m not commenting about the obesity epidemic in the United States, just the idea that a woman who is 5’10 and 120 lbs could be considered too heavy to model.

So, why aren’t “real women” in our magazines? Next in my pile happened to be the November issue of Glamour where I discovered a “plus-size” model, Lizzie Miller, had been making headlines all over the news because of an almost nude picture in the September issue of Glamour where you see her not so flat belly. A real women’s belly! After getting all kinds of positive attention, Glamour did a photo shoot for their November issue with 7 “plus-size” models. To Glamour’s credit, apparently they had used 6 of these 7 women in the past (and plan to continue the trend). Almost all had stories of starving themselves to fit into the size 0 world of modeling.

After devouring this article, I read the editor’s column. On that page they showed models through the years that included Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor – true beauties and women who were on the cover of many magazines in the ‘40’s and ‘50’s. Today, Ms. Monroe and Ms. Taylor would be “plus-sized”…How wonderful it would be to transition the American mindset back to this sort of beauty.

What are your thoughts on how we persuade more magazines to follow Glamour’s lead?

Scrubs Fashion: What Looks Good on a Male Nurse?

27 Oct

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I find the words “men’s fashion” in nursing rather intriguing. I’m a T-shirt-and-jeans kind of guy, so “fashion” isn’t something I generally pay much attention to. That said, as a so-called “male nurse,” I’ve found there hasn’t been much to choose from in the way of scrubs and shoes for men.

Over the last few years or so, men’s scrubs have come a long way. There now are many different solid colors and a few “masculine” prints available. But whenever I need new shoes for work, I go to the nurse uniform store hoping they’ll have more than one style of men’s shoes to choose from. It never happens. I’m beginning to believe that the “Big White Boat Shoe” is the only style of men’s nursing shoe in existence—and it makes you look like the Good Humor Man! The good thing for male nurses is that professional-looking, clean sneakers are now acceptable to wear.

Here are a few things that I think make male and female nurses look good as well as professional:

First, I feel solid colors are more acceptable for men. There are some really busy print scrub tops that I think can be distracting sometimes. However, on the peds floors, cute prints are totally acceptable because of their fun nature.

Many hospitals are trying to bring back the clean white scrubs look for their nurses. I believe this is an attempt to project that clean image that many laypeople identify nurses with. While I agree in principle with what this look says, as a nurse I feel it’s just not what I would call “street savvy.” All nurses who wear clean whites to work know that it’s just a matter of time before some type of body fluid gets on them. Yes, we all do our best “gowning up” to avoid this, but it inevitably happens. Then those clean whites aren’t projecting that “clean” image, if you know what I mean!

Another thing is: If you’re a guy, don’t mix and match your scrubs. If you’re wearing a blue top, wear the blue pants to match. Sports logo themed scrubs are good conversation pieces, and they offer men something different than just the solid scrubs.

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Many nurses now have tattoos, and there’s nothing wrong with that. But if you do, try your best to cover them up while you’re at work. Also, big hanging necklaces or earrings are more appropriate outside the workplace. Again, a professional image is what we’re trying to project, and unfortunately, people make snap judgments on how you look. Sad but true.
Outside the hospital, dress however you want. When you go to work, dress appropriately and professionally so you can project that strong, confident appearance that nurses should be identified with.

The content provided above is copyrighted and owned by Scrubs Magazine and is used by Allheart.com with express permission by Scrubs Magazine. For all blogs by Jim Demaria, go to http://scrubsmag.com/author/jimdemaria/.

10 Most Influential Female Nurses of All Time

27 Oct

Nurses impact lives every day. But once in a while, a nurse comes along who touches the lives of the world, and not just her patients. These women went above and beyond for the field of nursing. They served in wars, broke down racial barriers, and campaigned for women’s rights. They have become role models for women everywhere, not just nurses. However, nurses can be especially proud to share a title with these ten ladies.

1. Florence Nightingale

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“The Lady with the Lamp” is the quintessential nurse figure. She cared for the poor and distressed, and became an advocate for improving medical conditions for everyone. In her early life, Nightingale mentored other nurses, known as Nightingale Probationers, who then went to on also work to create safer, healthier hospitals.
In 1894, Nightingale trained 38 volunteer nurses who served in the Crimean War. These nurses tended to the wounded soldiers and sent reports back regarding the status of the troops. Nightingale and her nurses reformed the hospital so that clean equipment was always available and reorganized patient care. Nightingale soon realized that many of the soldiers were dying because of unsanitary living conditions, and, after the war, she worked to improve living conditions.
While she was at war, the Florence Nightingale Fund for the Training of Nurses was established in her honor. After the war, Nightingale wrote Notes on Nursing and opened the Women’s Medical College with Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell.
International Nurses Day is celebrated on Nightingale’s birthday, May 12, each year.

2. Margaret Sanger

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Best known as an activist for birth control and family planning, Margaret Sanger pioneered the women’s health movement. She distributed pamphlets with information on birth control and wrote on topics such as menstruation and sexuality. Her controversial opinions and disregard for the law often get Sanger in trouble. At one point she left to England under an alias in order to avoid jail.
In 1921, Sanger founded the American Birth Control League which eventually became Planned Parenthood. She began the Clinical Research Bureau in 1923 – the first legal birth control clinic in the US.

3. Clara Barton

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Clara Barton grew up wanted to take care of people. When her father fell ill, Clara helped to care for him until his death. This inspired her to take an interest in nursing, although she first went to school to become a teacher.
During the Civil War, Barton organized medical supplies to be brought to the battlefields. Soon enough, she was allowed to go to the battles herself in order to care for wounded soldiers. Her father taught her to be a true patriot, and these ideals shown through during Barton’s years serving during the Civil War. In 1864, Barton became the “Lady in Charge” of Union hospitals, and the following year President Lincoln charged Barton with finding missing Union soldiers.
During a trip to Europe, Barton encountered the International Committee of the Red Cross, and was motivated to create a branch back in America. In 1873, Barton began the American Red Cross, dedicated to helping disaster victims. She served as the organizations first president.

4. Mary Eliza Mahoney

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Mary Eliza Mahoney was the first African-American woman to become a nurse in the United States. Mahoney worked at the New England Hospital for Women and Children for 15 years before she was admitted into the adjacent nursing school. Mahoney dedicated her life to nursing, heading up the Howard Orphan Asylum for African-American children in New York. She was also one of the first members of the Nurses Associated Alumnae of the United States and Canada which later became the American Nurses Association.
In 1908, Mahoney co-founded the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses which eventually became part of the ANA. Each year, the ANA honors Ms. Mahoney with an award that represents her dedication to nursing and ending racial segregation. She has been inducted into both the ANA and National Women’s Hall of Fame.

5. Anna Caroline Maxwell

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Anna Caroline Maxwell was known as the “American Florence Nightengale.” During the Spanish-American War, Maxwell headed up the army nurses, thereby establishing the Army Nurse Corps. During WWI, Maxwell was given the Medal of Honor for Public Health.
Maxwell was an essential element to the progression of practical nursing. She began working at a hospital before she was formally trained, and after graduating the Boston City Training College for Nurses, Maxwell began the nurse training program at Montreal General Hospital. She also served as the superintendent of nurses at a number of east coast hospitals including Massachusetts General Hospital and St. Luke’s Hosptial. Maxwell was the first director of the New York Presbyterian Hospital which would become the Columbia School of Nursing.

6. Dorothea Lynde Dix

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Dorothea Dix is best known for creating the first mental health system in the United States. Inspired by a trip to England, Dix returned to America curious how the US government treated the mentally unstable. Dix spent many year petitioning Congress, drafting legislation, and documenting her visits to various states.
Dix first succeeded with the construction of the North Carolina State Medical Society in 1849, dedicated to the care of the mentally ill. Dix also assisted with legislation that called for 12,225 acres of land to be used for the “insane,” with proceeds of its sale going to build mental asylums.
During the Civil War, Dix served as Superintendent of the Union Army Nurses, although she was eventually relieved of her duties after butting heads with Army doctors. She was a staunch believer in caring for everyone, though, and her nurses were some of the only caretakers of Confederate soldiers.

7. Ellen Dougherty

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Ellen Dougherty, of New Zealand, was the first Registered Nurse in the world. New Zealand was the first country to initiate the Nurse Registration Act that allowed for legal registration of nurses prior to completion of training. Dougherty trained at the Wellington Hospital and was the matron at Palmerston North Hospital.

8. Mabel Keaton Staupers

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Mabel Keaton Staupers was an advocate for racial equality in the field of nursing. Staupers served as the secretary of the National Associated of Graduate Colored Nurses. She advocated for the introduction of African-American nurses into the Army and Navy during WWII.
In 1945, she won the fight and all nurses, regardless of race, were to be included in the military. In 1950, Staupers dissolved the NAGCN as it re-aligned with the American Nursing Association.

9. Linda Richards

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After receiving little training during her first attempt to become a nurse, Linda Richards enrolled as the first student in the first American Nurse’s training school. After graduating, she began work at Bellevue Hospital in New York. Recognizing the disorganization of keeping records, Richards developed a system to track individual records of each patient. The US and UK both readily adopted Richard’s system.
In 1874, Richards became the superintendent of the Boston Training School for Nurses and virtually turned the fledgling school around. Richards also traveled to England and was taught by Florence Nightingale. In her later years, Richards established the American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools and led the Philadelphia Visiting Nurses Society. In 1994, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.

10. Claire Bertschinger

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Claire Bertschinger worked for the International Red Cross during the highly-publicized 1984 famine in Ethiopia. She regularly was seen on television, and helped to inspire Bob Geldof to create the Band-Aid charily single. While in Ethiopia, she ran a number of children’s feeding centers, although she was never able to feed everyone.
Along with Ethiopia, she also worked in Panama, Lebanon and Papua New Guinea. Her experiences motivated her to write a book on her work, entitled Moving Mountains. Bertschinger has received the Florence Nightengale Medal, the Woman of the Year Award and the Human Rights in Nursing Award.

The content provided above is copyrighted and owned by Scrubs Magazine and is used by Allheart.com with express permission by Scrubs Magazine. For all blogs by nursinglink, go to http://scrubsmag.com/author/nursinglink/.

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