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ScrubZone!

26 Apr

We’re thrilled to be carrying the newly redesigned ScrubZone line from Landau. ScrubZone scrubs are constructed to work tough and fit comfortably—because when you work hard, you need scrubs that can keep up.

They come in 19 colors, from soothing aloe green to deep burgundy wine, so you’ll be sure to find a hue that fits your mood or dress code. Best of all, they’re a great value with Landau quality in every stitch.

Click here to shop ScrubZone now!

Earth Week

23 Apr

It’s the end of Earth Week, with Earth Day yesterday celebrating its 40th anniversary! More than 20 million Americans participated in that first Earth Day celebration in 1970 and participation has grown ever since.

A very simple way to continue “going green” is supporting eco-friendly companies like Dansko, which has a fantastic line of nursing shoes and clogs. Part of their corporate mission to be as environmentally conscience as possible: their corporate office is LEED certified, they operate the only recycling center in their town, and they have a “green team” to do even more.

The Reality of H1N1 Prevention

13 Nov

As the flu season ramps up, hospitals and doctors’ offices are once again being inundated with potential flu patients. This season, however, the influx is greater than ever. Patients are nervous about H1N1, and their fear is filling waiting rooms. Waiting rooms full of people who don’t have H1N1u.

The CDC has created a laundry list of suggestions for how to prevent the spread of H1N1. They suggest everything from N95 respirator masks, hand sanitizer, and partitions in waiting areas, to ventilation systems and restricted visitation rules. The real question is, however, what is actually being implemented in facilities around the country. Has your hospital taken any drastic measures to minimize the spread of H1N1? Have you created a special triage plan? Or a partitioned waiting area? Are you limiting patient transport if they are suspected of having influenza? Has your hospital come up with any creative solutions that go above and beyond the CDC’s recommendations?

How have these changes impacted your daily work? Or has your routine been unaffected? Perhaps there are some good ideas out there that aren’t being shared between facilities that we could all use to the advantage of our hospitals, patients and staff.

Women of All Shapes and Sizes

27 Oct

I just came back from a much needed, and rarely had treat – a manicure and pedicure. Part of the fun in blocking out the world while someone else tackles my hands and feet is the chance to indulge in magazines I never have time to read. As I sunk into the massaging chair and dunked my feet in the swirling water, I started flipping through the pages of the November 2nd issue of People. The first thing that grabbed me was a short blurb on a model who is 5’10, 120 pounds and, according to People Magazine, was fired by Ralph Lauren because she was too large to fit into the sample clothes used in their ads. She is considered too heavy to be a model at a size 4. Too heavy to be a model at a size 4? Have we lost our minds?

As nurses we see women and men of all shapes and sizes and we know that the average woman isn’t a size 0 (how can you be no size at all?). In fact, Wonderquest says the average American woman is just shy of 5’4 and weighs 152 pounds – about a size 14. I’m not commenting about the obesity epidemic in the United States, just the idea that a woman who is 5’10 and 120 lbs could be considered too heavy to model.

So, why aren’t “real women” in our magazines? Next in my pile happened to be the November issue of Glamour where I discovered a “plus-size” model, Lizzie Miller, had been making headlines all over the news because of an almost nude picture in the September issue of Glamour where you see her not so flat belly. A real women’s belly! After getting all kinds of positive attention, Glamour did a photo shoot for their November issue with 7 “plus-size” models. To Glamour’s credit, apparently they had used 6 of these 7 women in the past (and plan to continue the trend). Almost all had stories of starving themselves to fit into the size 0 world of modeling.

After devouring this article, I read the editor’s column. On that page they showed models through the years that included Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor – true beauties and women who were on the cover of many magazines in the ‘40’s and ‘50’s. Today, Ms. Monroe and Ms. Taylor would be “plus-sized”…How wonderful it would be to transition the American mindset back to this sort of beauty.

What are your thoughts on how we persuade more magazines to follow Glamour’s lead?

News: CDC Health Advisory

28 Apr

Swine Influenza (H1N1)

“…CDC, in collaboration with public health officials in California and Texas, is investigating cases of febrile respiratory illness caused by swine influenza (H1N1) viruses. As of 11 AM (EDT) April 25, 2009, 8 laboratory confirmed cases of Swine Influenza infection have been confirmed in the United States. Four cases have been reported in San Diego County, California. Two cases have been reported in Imperial County California. Two cases have been reported in Guadalupe County, Texas. Of the 8 persons with available data, illness onsets occurred March 28-April 14, 2009. Age range was 7-54 y.o. Cases are 63% male.
The viruses contain a unique combination of gene segments that have not been reported previously among swine or human influenza viruses in the U.S. or elsewhere. At this time, CDC recommends the use of oseltamivir or zanamivir for the treatment of infection with swine influenza viruses. The H1N1 viruses are resistant to amantadine and rimantadine but not to oseltamivir or zanamivir. It is not anticipated that the seasonal influenza vaccine will provide protection against the swine flu H1N1 viruses.
CDC has also been working closely with public health officials in Mexico, Canada and the World Health Organization (WHO). Mexican public health authorities have reported increased levels of respiratory disease, including reports of severe pneumonia cases and deaths, in recent weeks. CDC is assisting public health authorities in Mexico by testing specimens and providing epidemiological support. As of 11:00 AM (EDT) April 25, 2009, 7 specimens from Mexico at CDC have tested positive for the same strain of swine influenza A (H1N1) as identified in U.S. cases. However, no clear data are available to assess the link between the increased disease reports in Mexico and the confirmation of swine influenza in a small number of specimens. WHO is monitoring international cases. Further information on international cases may be found at: http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_04_24/en/index.html

Clinicians should consider swine influenza infection in the differential diagnosis of patients with febrile respiratory illness and who 1) live in San Diego or Imperial counties, California, or Guadalupe County, Texas, or traveled to these counties or 2) who traveled recently to Mexico or were in contact with persons who had febrile respiratory illness and were in one of the three U.S. counties or Mexico during the 7 days preceding their illness onset.
Patients who meet these criteria should be tested for influenza, and specimens positive for influenza should be sent to public health laboratories for further characterization. Clinicians who suspect swine influenza virus infections in humans should obtain a nasopharyngeal swab from the patient, place the swab in a viral transport medium, refrigerate the specimen, and then contact their state or local health department to facilitate transport and timely diagnosis at a state public health laboratory. CDC requests that state public health laboratories promptly send all influenza A specimens that cannot be subtyped to the CDC, Influenza Division, Virus Surveillance and Diagnostics Branch Laboratory.

Persons with febrile respiratory illness should stay home from work or school to avoid spreading infections (including influenza and other respiratory illnesses) to others in their communities. In addition, frequent hand washing can lessen the spread of respiratory illness.

CDC has not recommended that people avoid travel to affected areas at this time. Recommendations found at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/contentSwineFluUS.aspx will help travelers reduce risk of infection and stay healthy.

Clinical guidance on laboratory safety, case definitions, infection control and information for the public are available at:http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/investigation.htm.
• Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Biosafety Guidelines for Laboratory Workers: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/guidelines_labworkers.htm
• Interim Guidance for Infection Control for Care of Patients with Confirmed or Suspected Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in a Healthcare Setting: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/guidelines_infection_control.htm
• Interim Guidance on Case Definitions for Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Human Case Investigations: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/casedef_swineflu.htm
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports Dispatch (April 24) provide detailed information about the initial cases at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm58d0424a1.htm

For more information about swine flu: http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu

Additional information is also available by calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)…”

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